26 December 2011

“Bridesmaids” is an exceptional comedy that pokes fun at your typical wedding preparation. The film starts out with an awkward sex scene between the main character, Annie, and Ted, who we soon after find out is her sleazy “friend with benefits.” Annie had recently been dumped by her boyfriend when their bakery business failed, and has been left with low-self-esteem as a result. When Lillian, Annie’s best friend, gets engaged, Annie is asked to be her maid of honor. Starting at the engagement party, Annie finds herself in competition with Helen, one of the bridesmaids, over who is the bride’s best friend. She becomes overwhelmed having a carry the maid of honor title and cannot seem to win against a jealous bridesmaid, Helen. Annie becomes weary of the new friendship between Lillian and Helen, which leads to disaster. Helen is well-off with money and quickly takes over the planning of the wedding festivities. Besides the wedding storyline, we also see Annie’s relationship with an officer, Rhodes, who pulls her over one night. She develops a crush on Rhodes, an Irish cop who patrols on a street she commonly uses. They meet one night when he sees her car swerving down the road, assuming she is drunk. However, she quickly ruins things because she is not used to having good guys in her life. Annie must rise above her insecurities to save her failing friendship with Lillian, and not ruin her potential love connection with Officer Rhodes.

“Bridesmaids” is a film full of cinematography. It features shots with numerous different elements, a few being; overhead shots, long shots, and medium close-up shots. It is important for a film to consist of different techniques to help the film move along in a nice flowing fashion, and to avoid providing the audience with the same thing over and over again.

The high overhead shot can be found in the scene where all the bridesmaids went to Belle en Blanc, a chic bridal-gown studio to find the perfect bridesmaid dress. The girls had just come from a small run-down restaurant where they ate lots of chicken and meat. Once they got to the studio, they started feeling sick, and unfortunately ended up with sudden food poisoning. They all ran into the bathroom and the shot switches from behind them, to beside them, and finally above them. The overhead shot shows Rita using the toilet and Megan using the sink. The overhead shot is brilliant. It shows both girls at the same time and adds an unfamiliar angle for the audience.


A long shot is seen when Annie is sitting on the roof of the cop car with Officer Rhodes in a convenience store parking lot. The camera shows their entire body and the car too. We were even able to see part of the convenience store behind them. We see a considerable distance between the camera and the actors for it to be considered a long shot. If it had been a couple steps back it would have been called an extreme long shot. The long shot at times turns into a medium close-up of Annie and Rhodes showing their head and shoulders, during conversation.

“Bridesmaids” is a great comedy to watch among your young adult friends. I would not recommend this film to the younger audience because of its sexual content. Although, if you are of the correct age, and your looking for a good laugh, this is the movie for you.Many of the conversation scenes use the medium close-up shot. The medium shot is often used for conversation scenes because it captures the facial expressions of the characters.

"Bridesmaids" is a great comedy to watch among your young adult friends. I would not recommend this film to the younger audience because of its sexual content. Although, if you are of an appropriate age, and your looking for a good laugh, this is the movie for you.


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